At Exosome Sciences, we are working in collaboration with our majority shareholder, Aethlon Medical (Nasdaq:AEMD), to discover exosome-based biomarkers to diagnose and monitor Alzheimer's disease (AD), Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) and other neurological disorders. We are advancing a TauSome™ biomarker (also referred to as exosomal tau) as the basis for a candidate blood test to diagnose CTE in living individuals. In a recent a recent study, we observed TauSome levels to be significantly elevated in former NFL players as compared to same-age control subjects. High TauSome levels also correlated with poor performance in tests to evaluate cognitive decline. The preliminary results of the study were published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. We are now planning to establish a follow-on clinical collaboration with up to 200 former NFL football players and clinical investigators at multiple U.S. site locations. If fully enrolled, the study would be the largest to date in former professional football players, who are at a high risk of suffering from CTE.

TauSome™ detection and the use of a TauSome™ biomarker to identify and monitor CTE and other neurological disorders are protected by multiple patent applications.


Feb. 13, 2017 - A biomarker could tackle one of worst diseases in sports. In the days leading up to the New England Patriots' victory, a different team was working toward another potential first, one that could also have far-reaching implications for the National Football League and its players learn more...

Our TauSome™ biomarker was recently studied as a candidate to diagnose and monitor CTE through the DETECT (Diagnosing and Evaluating Traumatic Encephalopathy Using Clinical Tests) study, which was managed by ....
Click here to learn more


Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is a disease of the brain found in athletes, military veterans, and others with a history of repetitive head impacts. This type of trauma can trigger...
Click for more


Not long ago, CTE was considered an obscure and not well-defined disease. A pivotal moment that propelled CTE into the spotlight occurred when researchers at the Boston University (BU) CTE Center conducted a press conference during the week of Super Bowl XLIII in 2009.
Click for more